Facts and figures about young viewers

The focus of the 2015 edition is young viewers, as this is a universal point of interest for broadcasters and advertisers alike. Whilst some claim that TV is losing young viewers, the industry is very aware that this is to a great extent related to the way the medium is measured, as TV is consumed on an increasingly diverse range of platforms every day. The role TV plays in the life of this target group is unquestionable. TV is simply taking a new form and its content is now being watched on many devices…. But it all remains TV!

While the reality may be different from country to country, you will find below a collection of research which have been carried out in various markets, by different actors, who wanted to know more about millenials consumption of media, and more specifically of TV.

Please note that egta, ACT and EBU did not commission these pieces of research; it is a compilation of material kindly made available by members and industry partners, or publicly available online.

International / Global       Austria       Australia       Canada       Croatia       France       Hungary       Italy       Lithuania       Norway      Romania       UK       US

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Kids TV Report, Eurodata, 2015
UK, Italy, Spain, Germany and France

This report shows that despite the growth in online viewing, TV is still a very popular form of media across all ages. Irrespective of the label applied to young target groups, “digital natives”, “millenials” or “generation Z”, the conclusion is the same: children will always know a world with the Internet and connected devices. Just like the increase in the number of screens, the amount of time spent in front of each one has been gradually increasing in the past few years. In France, 63.6% of children between 0 and 15 years old live in a household with 4 screens (Home Devices Study, Médiamétrie, Q2 2015). Kids’ channels are not only numerous but they also attract a big share of the audience of kids in front of the TV. In four out of the five countries studied in the Kids TV Report, the preschooler’s channels represent more than half of the total market share of children’s channels.
More details can be found here and here.

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Young Adults Report (Sept 2014 – Apr 2015), Eurodata TV
10 European countries, Asia and North America

eurodata_tvThe report showcases that daily TV viewing time of 15-34 years olds depends on the country and varies widely, ranging from 1 hour 24 minutes in Sweden to 3 hours 18 minutes in the United States. Young Americans tend to be the only ones to spend over 3 hours a day watching TV, followed by Italian young viewers (2 hours 54 minutes) and Dutch ones (2 hours 37 minutes). Young adults enjoy iconic programmes, with entertainment being the most preferred genre followed by fiction.
More details can be found here.

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TV Redefined, Viacom, 2015
Global

viacomThe study explores how people are watching television in this transforming viewing environment. The results are surprising and, in some ways, comforting. In an ever-more digitally connected world, television and great stories still connect people to each other-perhaps now more than ever. The report also sheds light on global viewers’ evolving habits – how they discover and consume content – and illustrates how content creators and TV providers can redefine their relationship with viewers in the new TV landscape.
More details can be found here.

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Why We Watch Television, Sony, 2015
Global

Why We Watch Television is a report by the informitv consultancy, commissioned by Sony, exploring the various social and emotional needs that drive television viewing. There’s a popular view that the growth of online video means that people will watch less television through traditional channels. The multi-billion dollar question is whether young people will ever end up watching in the same way as their parents. However, it may be more a matter of life stage. When they grow up and have children, this generation may become more like their parents than they might wish to imagine. Why we watch television argues that powerful social and psychological factors drive the viewing experience. Understanding how and why people currently choose to watch television will help inform our view of video in the future.
More details can be found here and the full report can be downloaded here.

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Kids study 2015, RTL Plus
Austria

super_rtlKids study 2015 was conducted in March 2015 among children between 6 and 12 years old and their parents who watch TV at least 1x per week. The survey showed that TV usage is the preferred leisure time activity for children due to entertainment and relaxing factor as well as for social life, such as being up to date at school. According to results, younger children have a more focused TV usage; parents have more influence on the content their children are watching which proves to be an important element for parents being critical regarding the online usage of their children. The main factor is control and safety.
More details can be found here.

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2015 Media Consumer Survey, Deloitte
Australia

deloitteThe report shows that while Australians are embracing both online and offline media consumption, television advertising continues to have the biggest influence on buying decisions. In regards to youth’s TV consumption, TV comes 3rd for trailing millennials (14-25) as they call them.
More details can be found here.

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Millennials and TV viewing 2015, MTM
Canada

mtmIn Canada, young people between the ages of 18 and 34 are still very much interested in television with 95% of them watching TV (from any platform) each month resulting in almost 12 and a half hours of viewing on a weekly basis. This analysis of the Canadian market shows that within this group known as Millenials, viewing is as high as it was a decade ago. Despite their love and interest in online TV, however, Millenials still spend more of their time watching TV on a TV set than they do watching online (7.4hrs/wk versus 4.9hrs/wk).
More details can be found here: document 1, document 2; infographics are available here: document 3, document 4.

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Numeris, Total Canada, A18-34, 2014-2015 Broadcast year
Canada

numerisAccording to this report, TV reaches 96.1% of Millennials every week, and 82.3% of Millennials every day. These are defined as young people between 18 and 34 years old. They spend 7.6 times more time watching television each week than they do on YouTube and 17 times more time with television than with Netflix. In addition, they also spend 3.3 times more time watching television than they spend on Facebook, Instagram and Twitter combined.
More details can be found here and here.

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AGB Nielsen, Nova TV
Croatia

novaThis research revealed that the viewing time on youngsters (4-14) in Croatia is still rather high with average viewing time of more than 3 hours per day. Viewing time in 2014 even recorded slight increase compared to 2013 (+4 minutes).
More details can be found here.

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How do children choose between live TV and VOD, Lagardère Pub, OMG, 2015
France

lagardere_omg_ipsosIn France, almost 3/4 of children between 4 and 14 years old have access to a minimum 1 personal screen. Consumption of TV on demand have become massive in France but still complementary to live television. 79% of children use both with 15% exclusively watching live television and 3% exclusively content on demand. Frequently they watch television with the whole family, namely 83% of children watch it live at least once per day and 57% say they do the same with on demand.
More details can be found here.

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Trust in advertising throughout the world, Nielsen, 2015
France

nielsenA recent worldwide Nielsen report on advertising trust shows that the 21-34 generation are the one that trusts TV advertising more with a 67 % score. TV advertising is the most trusted advertising medium.
More details can be found here and here.

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Nielsen Audience Measurement, MTVA, 2014
Hungary

mtva_nielsenThis survey was focused on youth between 13 and 29 years. In 2014, 55.7% of them watched television every day, and the average daily time spent watching TV was 316 minutes. The results of the report, which did not even include platforms outside of traditional TV sets, have shown that nowadays many young people do not watch TV every day and therefore the daily reach has been reduced. However, if they sit down to watch TV, the time spent watching is at least as long as in the past or even longer.
More details can be found here.

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Italy

Italian Millennials (15-34 years olds representing 39,3 million people) watched Television for 153 minutes on an average day in the period November 2014 – October 2015. Amongst Millennial TV users, the figure rises to 257 average daily minutes. Highest rated programmes include live football matches, reality and talent shows. (source: Auditel)

GfK also underlines that 89,4% of Italian Millennial TV viewers watch Television every day, corresponding to 217 daily consumption minutes. Amongst the total millennial population, the average daily time budget is divided as follows: 194 minutes for Television, 40 for the Internet, 22 for radio, 10 for print media. The same source shows that Italian Millennials have also a more positive attitude toward TV advertising than the entire population. They pay more attention to TV commercials (8% more than the total population) and consider them to be more useful (+17%).

Young people love RAI TV, Auditel & Censis, Rai Pubblicità, 2015

censis_rai_pubFigures about three successful TV shows: The Voice, Braccialetti Rossi, Pechino Express.
Target: 14-29 years old.
More details can be found here.

Young people love Mediaset TV, Auditel, 2015

auditel_publitaliaFigures about the Saturday night show, reality TV (for ex. Big Brother) and the best performing talent show for young adults: Amici.
Target: 15-34 years old.
More details can be found here.

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Youth Intact 2015, TNS Lithuania
Lithuania

tnsDaily average time spent watching TV for youngsters in Lithuania increased for 5% since 2014. Youngsters aged between 14 and 25 watched 4:26h of TV this year compared to 4:14h the year before.
More details can be found here.

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Children and media, Medietilsynet, 2014
Norway

medietilsynetThe report describes how children perceive their own media access and media habits, use of Internet and digital games, regulation of and protection for different media content, as well as cyber – bullying and online security.
More details can be found here.

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Youth Intact 2015, Kantar Media, Jan-October 2015 and Consumer Report, Starcom MediaVest
Romania

kantar_starcomIn Romania, television remains the leading media channel for young people. More than 99% of TV is watched live and over 5 hours a day among youngsters between 4 and 17 and 18 and 29 years old. For them TV content acts as a time-filler and it’s often used as a reward for their daily efforts.
More details can be found here.

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‘Truth about Youth’ study 2015, Thinkbox
UK

thinkboxMain findings of this report reveal that TV accounts for 81% of UK video consumption; 65% for 16-24 year olds. It explains how and why young people’s video diet is different and concludes that ‘boredom-busting’ is a key motivation for watching online video. As this age group is often constrained in terms of access and control of the main TV screen, the report says that it is self-evident why 16-24s watch more video on devices such as tablets and smartphones.
More details can be found here.

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The Communications market report, Ofcom, 2015
UK

ofcomThis report states that in the UK, the 25-34 age group time-shifts almost a quarter of their TV viewing as well as describes TV viewing figures by age group. One of the most important findings is that a constant factor across all age groups is that watching traditional TV makes up the majority of all TV viewing time, and while the proportion of time spent watching programmes other than at the time of broadcast has grown, viewing programmes live (traditional TV viewing) remains the preferred way overall of watching TV programmes and films.
More details can be found here.

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Monitor Report 2015, Childwise
UK

childwiseThis is a comprehensive annual report focused on children and young people’s media consumption, purchasing habits and social issues. More than 2000 children aged 5-16 in schools across the UK took part in this survey which covered a range of topics including their favourite apps, what they spend money on, sports they play, and their plans for the future.
More details can be found here.

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Media use by tweens and teens, Common Sense Media, 2015
US

commonsenseThis study shows that traditional media still dominates among teens. They are consuming an average of nine hours of media per day without including homework or school related activities. On top of the list comes TV and music, meaning that almost two-thirds (62%) of teens watch TV every day, whereas 24% watch online videos and 27% play mobile games every day.
More details can be found here and here.

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Young TV Viewers, Nielsen Npower Sunday, VAB analysis of comScore,2015
US

nielsenThe first chart looks at daily & monthly time spent with ad-supported TV from September 2015 by 7 different age groups, including P13-17 & P18-24. And the second chart looks at monthly time spent “by screen” for p18-34 – and reveals ad-supported TV time at 2X the overall time spent with the 4 portals (Google/Youtube, AOL, Yahoo & MSN) and Facebook combined.
More details can be found here.

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The total audience report, Nielsen, 2015
US

nielsenThis report highlights “A Week in the Life,” where Television viewing is compared to other media, such as Game Consoles, PC Usage (Internet and Video) and Smartphone (App/Wen and Video). Each week, Adults 18-24 spend 16 hours and 26 minutes on average with TV, while A25-34 spend 22 hours and 09 minutes with it. Video on a PC was only 1 hour and 47 minutes for A18-24, and 2 hours and 08 minutes for A25-34.
More details can be found here.

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TVB Media Comparison Study, GFK Multimedia Mentor Scan, 2014
US

gfkThe main finding of this study is that TV has the highest average daily time spent at 3.87 hours (Radio was a distant second at 1.57 hours).
More details can be found here.

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June 2015 polling by PwC
US

pwcAccording to this report, traditional TV sets are the primary device used by 24% of children and teens in the US to consume content. The younger kids were, the more likely they were to have traditional TV as their top device. Among those aged 8 to 11, for example, 31% were more likely to use old-school televisions than any other device. The survey also acknowledges that kids were most likely to increase media time (TV) over the summer as well, along with movies and concludes that “Kids today may be digital natives, but TV is still their most common media usage device in a typical week.”
More details can be found here and here.

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Consumer Intelligence Series: What kids want, PwC, Sept 2015
US

pwcThis report focused on kids and teenagers between 8 and 18 years old (and a group of parents) and studied their consumer attitudes and preferences when it came to discovering and engaging with content and who controls content in the home. The top ranking/most favourite type of content/programming among the respondents is the streamed television from cable channels (53%). Drama or reality series on cable channels came second (47%) and video games came as third (36%). More details can be found here.

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The TV Revolution: Tidal Wave or Rising Tide?, Hub Research, 2015
US

hubThis research looked at US millennials and their TV viewing habits which the conductors further commented by saying that “The older you are, the more time you’ve spent with traditional pay TV as your only option. And people tend to use what’s familiar to them. But it’s important to note that adoption of online TV sources is happening among all age groups. Younger people or those with an affinity for technology may be adopting them faster, but their value proposition is compelling to anyone who watches TV.”
More details can be found here.